06 April 2017 – PNW Migration Update

Well, it’s raining again.  But, there was a gap during the night and our northbound feathered cohabitants took advantage of the break.

Black-throated Gray Warblers, Orange Crowned Warblers, Caspian Terns, Calliope Hummingbirds, Yellow-headed Blackbirds, Common Yellowtrhoats, Evening Grosbeaks and Chipping Sparrows — now being reported in or around the 45th parallel.  It happens like that; in a mad rush.

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30 March 2017 – PNW Migration Update

We can see a few birds on the move darting and weaving between rain cells last night.  At least it’s something!

New arrivals being reported: Vaux’s Swifts, Common Yellowthroat, and now all five swallows.

20 March 2017 – PNW Migration Update

A very rainy weekend — again.  It cleared up late Saturday night but too late for any birds of significant numbers to move north.

But, last night was clear and there was an accommodating south wind so the birds were on the move.  We’re still at the beginning of the migration so we are not getting “green doughnuts” but we do have some 20+ dBZ returns.

In the Central Valley more Western Kingbirds are being reported as well as Common Yellowthroats.  In the Portland area Violet-green Swallows, Rufus Hummingbirds, Osprey and an increasing number of shorebirds.  I observed over sixty Greater Yellowlegs, a few L.B. Dowitchers and a large flock of peeps (unidentified) on the wing this weekend.

The Central and Mississippi Flyways were also pretty active last night.  National Composite Radar is included thanks to Paul

11 April 2016 – PNW Migration Update

Since i take the weekends off from this project i’m not sure what the birds were up to Friday and Saturday night.

But i do know what they were doing in the field.  Duck numbers are down, Snow Geese are gone but there are plenty of Cacklers still around.  A few more shorebirds are around.  The snipe are winnowing, Sooty Grouse are booming and a few cranes are practicing their mating dance.  Common Yellowthoats are firmly entrenched. Chipping Sparrows are dotting the landscape.  And northbound Blue-winged Teal are popping up in their usual low density numbers but to the delight of those who happen upon this strikingly beautiful bird.

On the listserves; MacGillivray’s Warbler, Black-headed Grosbeak, and Western Tanager have made it to the Willamette Valley.

Outliers of Hammond’s Flycatcher, Swainson’s Thrush and Western Wood Pewee have been reported as well.  Treat those as you will.

Last night we had light to moderate migration across the region so i am going to conserve cloud space and only put in the RTX loop today.  LGX and ATX both had approximately the same density.

06 April 2016 – PNW Migration Update

Moderate movement around the region last night but heavier than last night.

Early House Wrens, more Nashville Warblers and Cassin’s Vireos. Common Yellowthroats are everywhere now.  Vesper Sparrows have returned to their north valley breeding grounds.

The weather is a mixed and confused bag of competing systems right now, so it’s hard to tell where this is going in the next few days.

05 April 2016 – PNW Migration Update

Too much to do on the weekends – but the nocturnal flights during the good weather were in the moderate to heavy range.  Alas, i didn’t archive any loops.

Today, with cross winds, the flight was light last night.

Take a look at the Wind Map  and you can see why the Central Flyway had most of the action.

Common Yellowthroat, Barn Swallow, Northern Rough-winged Swallow, Cliff Swallow, Caspian Tern, Chipping Sparrow, Black-throated Gray Warbler, American White Pelican — all now being reported in good numbers in the Portland/Vancouver Basin.

Early arrivals in Oregon include: Vaux’s Swift, Nashville Warbler, Pacific-slope Flycatcher.

As well as arrivals there are also departures,  Tundra Swan, Snow Goose, Canvasback, Ruddy Duck, Ring-necked Duck  — all significantly down in numbers

 

29 March 2016 – PNW Migration Update

Continuing north winds probably hampered migration a bit, but not completely.  There was a nice push of birds in east Clark County probably originating from Steigerwald.

Looks like this ridge of high pressure may stick around for a while.  That will bring some much needed relief from the rain, but as long as it hangs in the Gulf of Alaska we will continue get these north winds aloft.

One glance at the Winds of the Earth and you can pretty much guess the Central Flyway and possibly the southern part of the Atlantic Flyway is set up for decent migrating conditions.

Black-headed Grosbeaks have made it to San Diego, Common Yellow-throat and Northern Rough-winged Swallows to the Willamette Valley.